Plant Family Identification - D
This page applies only to those plant families identified within the Wildflowers of Escambia site. When the page has loaded, scroll down to find the general plant family description.

 

Diapensiaceae (Diapensia) -- Evergreen shrubs or small tufted shrubs with solitary or clustered pink or white flowers.

The flowers are radially symmetrical. The calyx and corolla each are five-lobed. There are five stamens that may be united into a tube. All parts are attached at the base of the ovary.

The leaves are simple (one whole part), alternate or opposite on the stem.

Fruit is a capsule.

Worldwide there are six genera and about 10 species. The plants are native to the Northern Hemisphere and are often grown in alpine and rock gardens.

There are no records of any family members having resided in the Escambia region.

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Dionaeaceae (Venus Flytrap) -- There is only one known species in this family. At this date no Venus Flytrap has been reported in the Escambia region.

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Dipsacaceae (Teasel) -- The family is made up of herbs with flowers clustered in dense heads.

Teasel
Dipsacus sylvestris

The flowers are bilaterally symmetrical, each associated with two united bracts forming a calyx-like structure; five sepals, five united petals and four stamens. All parts are attached at the top of the ovary.

The leaves consist of one whole part or deeply divided; positioned opposite on the stem.

Fruit is seed-like.

There are about 10 genera and some 270 species worldwide. Some family members are grown as ornamental garden plants. The dried plant has commercial uses and value.

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Droseraceae (Sundew) -- Plant members are insectivorus herbs. mostly of acidic bogs, with flowers in a raceme or openly branched clusters.

Round-Leaved Sundew
Drosera rotundifolia

The flowers are radially symmetrical, consisting of five united sepals, five petals and five separated stamens. All parts are attached at the base of the ovary.

The leaves are overed with sticky glandular hairs in which insects become trapped.

Fruit is a capsule with two to five chambers.

There are four genera and about 100 known species, which generally grow in very poor soil, so that extra nutrients obtained from digested insects may be devoted mostly to seed production.

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